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Middlebury Village Continued

Elsewhere in Town Each street in town and virtually every house on it has played a role in the composite history of Middlebury. However, to note every house, date, builder and subsequent owner would be beyond the intended scope of this booklet, though such information can readily be gleaned from the materials in the research wing of the Sheldon Museum. Rather, it is our purpose here to note other buildings and sites of particular interest that would not conveniently fit into the framework of the walking tour.

Court Street

View looking south on Court Street in the late nineteenth or early twentieth century.

ABOVE View looking south on Court Street in the late nineteenth or early twentieth century. Stewart-Swift Research Center at the Henry Sheldon Museum, Postcards

BELOW The Sargent House Hotel (formerly the Middlebury Hotel) at 15 Court Street. Stewart-Swift Research Center at the Henry Sheldon Museum, Postcards

View of the Sargent House Hotel (formerly the Middlebury Hotel) at 15 Court Street.

9 Court Street A house of 1823 completely transformed by an elaborate Victorian remodeling in the 1880s. The bay windows, porches, brackets, fascias under the eaves, and dormers are quite typical of the woodwork from Smith and Allen's Mill Street shop. The Second Empire mansard roof and tower exhibit particularly fine multi-colored (polychrome) state work, popular in the Middlebury area during the Victorian period.

12 Court Street Built in 1827 by Nahum Parker as a cabinet shop, this is reputedly the shop in which the Brandon-born Stephen A. Douglas learned his trade.

13 Court Street Built in 1796 by Erastus Hawley at the corner of Court and Washington Streets and moved about 1828 by Nahum Parker for his residence. It has been substantially remodeled for retail purposes.

15 Court Street The old Middlebury Hotel, built in 1811 (and much remodeled) adjacent to the old Addison County Fair Grounds (now the Recreation Park). Just to the south of this is the site where the 1796 courthouse stood until 1939 as an exhibition building for the fair.

31 Court Street The delightfully elaborate Victorian remodeling (1881) of an 1810 Cape Cod house.

35 Court Street The 1846 Addison County jail, third jail to be built in Middlebury. It is a fine brick structure in a simple Greek Revival taste. Until the 1960s the cells were completely lined with slabs of Brandon marble. Changing penal patterns in the state led to the closure of the county jail in 1971 and then to its reopening with some renovations in 1984. In 1996 an expansion was designed and built by Breadloaf Construction Company, with a renovation of the cell block to increase the number of cells from 12 to 21 and the addition of a sally port, day room, and an exercise court.

Washington Street

View of Washington Street, looking northwest from the intersection of Washington and High Streets, in the early twentieth century. Colonel Isley's barn at 24 Washington Street is in the right foreground.

View of Washington Street, looking northwest from the intersection of Washington and High Streets, in the early twentieth century. Colonel Isley's barn at 24 Washington Street is in the right foreground. Stewart-Swift Research Center at the Henry Sheldon Museum, Gipson Collection

The Old Stone Jail at 17 Washington Street, undated.

ABOVE The Old Stone Jail at 17 Washington Street, undated. Stewart-Swift Research Center at the Henry Sheldon Museum, General Collection

BELOW The Leonard Deming House at 36 – 38 Washington Street, undated. Stewart-Swift Research Center at the Henry Sheldon Museum, Postcards

The Leonard Deming House at 36 – 38 Washington Street, undated.
The Deacon Crane House at 51 Washington Street, undated.

The Deacon Crane House at 51 Washington Street, undated. Image used courtesy of Glenn M. Andres

7 Washington Street Middlebury's first jail (1794), moved to this site from Court Square in 1812 and remodeled first for use as a dwelling and later as offices. The cells originally had walls of stout planks ribbed with wrought iron rods stapled to the planking.

15 Washington Street Early 19th-century blacksmith shop, repaired in 1815 by John Houghton, now a residence.

17 Washington Street Middlebury's second jail, built by Jabez Rogers in 1811. This handsome stone building was converted into a residence in the 1840s by Oliver Wellington with the addition of the back ell and some fine Greek Revival details. The lights around the front door are set with an uncolored variant of the etched glass that was popular in Victorian Middlebury.

27 Washington Street Site of the small 1801 house of Samuel Coe, one of Middlebury's first and reputedly finest house joiners. Coe was murdered here, and his heirs sold the property to Elisha Brewster, who had the front two-story structure built in 1815. The old back wing, thought to be haunted, was supposedly removed and replaced. Brewster's was a Federal Style townhouse, oriented end-on to the street and detailed with an elliptical attic light and some of the finest cove mouldings in Middlebury. The Greek Revival porch, doorway, and tall first floor windows are the results of a remodeling of the 1840s. In the side yard was located one of Middlebury's old fire protection cisterns.

30 Washington Street Nathaniel Ripley House, about 1815.

36 – 38 Washington Street Leonard Deming House, 1810.

51 Washington Street The Deacon J. Erwin Crane residence. This structure was built by Clinton Smith in 1881 with a wildly eclectic use of the popular styles of the day. Here elements of French, Italian, and Gothic Revival mix and blend to make one of Middlebury's most remarkable Victorian houses.

53 Washington Street This cottage, built in 1871 for Sylvester B. Rockwell, a wealthy sheep merchant, who owned nearby "Springside" at 39 Seminary Street, is a charming example of Carpenter's Gothic, which was popular in Vermont through the middle decades of the century.

68 Washington Street Extension Built by Clinton Smith for Luther Farnsworth in 1882, this is one of Smith's most delightful and elaborately detailed creations in wood. Particularly noteworthy are such Stick Style elements as the pseudo structure of the tower and dormer and the elaborate brackets of the porches.

Washington Street Extension Burial ground used in the last years of the eighteenth and early years of the 19th century by village families. Here can be found members of the Painter, Simmons, and Miller families.

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